----- Original Message -----
From: Paul Fromm
Sent: Friday, June 10, 2005 7:50 AM
Subject: B.C. Sikh "Hate" Attack Hoax Exposed & Ignored



Dear Immigration Reformer:

If there ever was an example of biased, politically correct anti-White policing, this is it. The 17-year-old Sikh hoaxster, who alleged that five Whites had ripped away his turban and cut off his hair has admitted that it was all a lie. He, apparently, had not wanted to wear his hair long, had rebelled, gotten scared and then spread this "hate" story.

Initially, the press and cops were if full howl, denouncing racism and vowing to get the perpetrators. The establishmentís chronic anti-White bias and knee-jerk pro-minority stance were clear.

Now, after consultation with the Sikh community -- the White community is, of course, ignored -- the cops have decided: "This incident is not as much about criminality as it is culture, compassion, and the emotions of a young person." For what itís worth, a Vancouver paper found that 85 per cent of those surveyed wanted the lying youth charged. But who cares about Canadiansí opinions?

Now, if an angry young White, disillusioned with the immigration invasion, neither he nor his parents were ever consulted about or approved, were to spray paint graffiti and get caught, the same cops would have no problem throwing the book at him and seeking an additional sentence for "hate." There'd be not sympathy for the "culture, compassion, and the emotions of a young person," if he were White.

Certainly, in Vancouver, we're dealing with a highly politicized, indeed, a political police force.

Interestingly, neither as self-styled victim or as hoaxer is the Sikh youth named. Canadian taxpayers are not permitted to know the names of those who abuse our hospitality and system.

Paul Fromm
Director
CANADA FIRST IMMIGRATION REFORM COMMITTEE



 

 



Youth in B.C. racist attack hoax won't be charged, RCMP
Wed Jun 8, 8:50 PM ET

 

RICHMOND, B.C. (CP) - No charges will be laid against a Sikh teenager who claimed that a group of white men had ripped off his turban and cut off his hair, the RCMP said Wednesday.

The 17-year-old Indo-Canadian told police he was jumped by five Caucasian men in broad daylight on the grounds of an elementary school in this Vancouver suburb on May 26. The youth later admitted he made up the story, injured himself and cut off his own hair. Sikhs do not cut their hair.

"This incident is not as much about criminality as it is culture, compassion, and the emotions of a young person," the RCMP said in a statement. "This is a time that calls for calm understanding and not a time to be thinking about criminal charges."

Police said the youth has agreed to participate in the restorative justice program, but they did not give details of what that means in his case.

"The RCMP has been working very closely with the Sikh community to do the right thing and we know that the Sikh community and its leadership are also interested in compassion and understanding," the police statement said. "The RCMP and our partners do not believe it is in the best interest of this young person or society in general to have this incident carry forth through criminal charges."

A similar claim by a youth in Surrey, B.C., several years ago also turned out to be a hoax.



Sikh youth hair attack 'victim' admits hoax
CTV.ca News Staff

A Sikh youth in B.C. has apologized for inventing a story of being set upon by a group of white men who cut his hair. The 17-year-old from Richmond, a Vancouver suburb, admitted to police he made up the story.

Police had already been suspicious, because the attack, which had been alleged to have occurred in broad daylight on May 26, had generated no tips from the public. "He had fabricated the entire incident," RCMP Cpl. Peter Thiessen told reporters Saturday. "The injuries that we observed on him that required medical attention were self-inflicted," he said.

The youth had claimed the five men stopped their basketball game, pulled off his turban and cut his long hair with a utility knife. Hair is considered sacred by Sikhs. But the youth merely wanted to cut his hair but was afraid to deal with his parents. "... His hair was hanging out, so it looked like he was attacked," said Sheldon D'Cruz, a friend of the youth who came upon him minutes after the hoax.

Sikh leaders denounced the attack, but when the hoax was revealed, were largely silent. Some Sikhs expressed annoyance with the youth, saying it cast their faith in a bad light.

In a statement released Friday night, the boy said he didn't realize this incident would blow up the way it did: "My sincere apologies to my family, friends, the RCMP and overall community -- whose feelings I have hurt in this whole ordeal. I have to work very hard to rebuild the trust I lost." Thiessen said the case is being reviewed to decide if a criminal charge should be laid against the youth.

With a report from CTV's Tomasia DaSilva



Youth in B.C. racist attack hoax won't be charged, RCMP
Wed Jun 8, 8:50 PM ET

RICHMOND, B.C. (CP) - No charges will be laid against a Sikh teenager who claimed that a group of white men had ripped off his turban and cut off his hair, the RCMP said Wednesday. The 17-year-old Indo-Canadian told police he was jumped by five Caucasian men in broad daylight on the grounds of an elementary school in this Vancouver suburb on May 26.

The youth later admitted he made up the story, injured himself and cut off his own hair. Sikhs do not cut their hair. "This incident is not as much about criminality as it is culture, compassion, and the emotions of a young person," the RCMP said in a statement. "This is a time that calls for calm understanding and not a time to be thinking about criminal charges."

Police said the youth has agreed to participate in the restorative justice program, but they did not give details of what that means in his case. "The RCMP has been working very closely with the Sikh community to do the right thing and we know that the Sikh community and its leadership are also interested in compassion and understanding," the police statement said.

"The RCMP and our partners do not believe it is in the best interest of this young person or society in general to have this incident carry forth through criminal charges." A similar claim by a youth in Surrey, B.C., several years ago also turned out to be a hoax.
 

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